How to start thread when a knot and anchoring stitches are not an option?

How to start thread when a knot and anchoring stitches are not an option?

I've been so focused on telling more about the stitches lately, that I only now realized that I didn't share anything from my own embroidery for quite a while. GASP! Well, to tell the truth, there's not that much to show... But there's something that might be of interest in my current process regarding starting the thread issue ;)

So, in the picture above you can see the start of my new small stitching. That's a symmetrical design I borrowed from the Godey's magazine. It's not present on the list of the vintage embroidery books that I posted a while ago, because it is so huge (more than 1000 pages!!) that I didn't have the powers to check its contents entirely. But I would definitely recommend to page it through at least a little, there are some designs worth attention :)

This type of linear designs are perfect for practicing stem stitch, so that's what I decided to go for. Just look at these tight curves! Working such swishes in stem stitch can be a little tough and challenging but the main secret here is to make the stitches tinier. Sometimes my stitches here grabbed only one thread of fabric. Surely, it is more time consuming, but its worth the effort!

How to start thread when a knot and anchoring stitches are not an option?

In addition, it is a good chance to grasp the concept of changing the direction of stem stitch, because you do that a LOT in this design!

But that's not really the subject of today's post. What I wanted to share today are practical examples of securing your thread when you start embroidering a linear design. 

And before we dive into the subject you might want to check the 3 ways to start your thread post, to have a better idea of what I'm speaking about.

Normally, I stick to anchoring stitches when I want to start my thread – either when I fill in the shapes or when I work the lines. However, on some occasions (some fabrics and some particular stitches) I find that the anchoring stitches are quite noticeable. This design is that type of occasion when anchoring stitches are not the best option. So, instead, I used the couching method.

How to start thread when a knot and anchoring stitches are not an option?

For this, when you bring the needle up the first time, you need to leave a considerable “tail” on the backside (I leave about 2 cm), which you then couch with your stitching. Stem stitch fits perfectly for this way of starting the thread, because it leaves small “back stitches” on the backside, which you can use for couching the thread. After you couch it, you can snip the remaining part of the “tail”. But I usually leave it and snip after I finish the embroidery :)

The funny thing with stitching this design was that the processes of starting and ending thread always happened at the same place – at these tough curves! Well, that's symmetry for you, ha.

How to start thread when a knot and anchoring stitches are not an option?

There's one more way of securing the thread that I'm using in this design. These curves are not going to be empty – I'm going to make a veeeery simple grid using one strand of thread in the needle. This means couching is not possible, anchoring stitches are again not an option. A tiny knot?

How to start thread when a knot and anchoring stitches are not an option?

Not an option either, because it can pass through the hole in the fabric. It's not that closely woven, as you see. So, what I do in such cases is anchoring my thread on the nearest stitches.

How to start thread when a knot and anchoring stitches are not an option?

I just run the thread under few of the previous stitches (sometimes can run twice under one stitch). I pull the thread gently and as soon as I feel that it is secured decently, I can snip the knot (if it's there, because you can do that without a knot as well).

How to start thread when a knot and anchoring stitches are not an option?

So, that's it for today. Sometimes you have to be inventive when you stitch and want to avoid the knots... If you have any more questions about securing the thread when you start it, you can write in the comments below, or send me a message through the contact form on the right :) 


Hope you all have a nice weekend and enjoy some stitching! 

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