Padded satin stitch tutorial

Padded satin stitch tutorial

It's Wednesday and it means that we will speak about a new stitch today! Last week we took a look at satin stitch basics which can be worked with or without an outlining. A very handy stitch, great for filling in all sorts of shapes and sometimes can be used exclusively to work whole designs. Today we will speak about its “upgraded” version – padded satin stitch.

The instructions are quite easy, especially if you are friends with a normal satin stitch, you probably won't meet any difficulties.

So, first of all, we make an outline for the shape using one of the line stitches. I usually use split stitch, but back stitch and stem stitch will fit in here too.

Padded satin stitch tutorial

Next, we fill in the shape with stitches – this is what we call the padding. This area will be covered later, so your stitches don't have to be perfect – no one will see. What's important here is functionality, not the appearance. I tend to use parallel stitches, and I don't really fret if they are not placed evenly. I know that some stitchers prefer seed stitches for the padding. You can use anything you want, really, the main thing is that the area is padded, so that the satin stitch doesn't hand in the air but lies on top of the stitches.

Padded satin stitch tutorial

Now, after the shape has been padded inside, we can start with the satin stitch. And just like we did in the basics post, we start from somewhere around the middle, slanting our stitches.

Padded satin stitch tutorial

We fill in one side of the shape and then return back to the middle, where the first stitch was made, and fill in the rest of the shape.

Padded satin stitch tutorial

And our padded satin stitch is ready. 

Padded satin stitch tutorial

If you are satisfied you can leave it like that. But, actually, there's no limit to the number of layers you can make this way! ;)

So, suppose, you think your shape needs a bit more dimension. Then you just start a new layer of satin stitch. Make a slanted stitch somewhere around the middle of the shape (change its angle)...

Padded satin stitch tutorial

... and go on covering the area with parallel stitches.

Padded satin stitch tutorial


The more layers you do, the more raised your shape will be. Well, to be honest, I used padded satin stitch with two layers at most (like for the dark blue center of the flowers in the Winter Joy wreath) and didn't experiment with having more than that. But I think it would be interesting to try!

No comments