Open and raised fishbone stitches and leaf stitch


Open and raised fishbone stitches and leaf stitch

Today we have a big task ahead of us! 3 new stitches to learn :)


Like always, I'm all for effective learning and since these stitches are quite similar, let's save some time and study them all at the same time!

Open and raised fishbone stitches and leaf stitch

By the way, two of today's stitches are based on fishbone stitch so I recommend checking it out if you don't know how to work it. It will make everything clearer for you.

Without further ado, let's start!

Open fishbone stitch


If you know how to work fishbone stitch, this one will be a piece of cake! The only thing different is that here the stitches are placed more sparsely. But let's start from the beginning :)

open fishbone stitch

Divide the leaf (or any other shape) in 2 parts with a border along the center. I usually make 1 straight stitch at the top for a sharper point, but that's optional. Now bring the needle on one of the sides.

open fishbone stitch

And make a diagonal stitch that finished over the central line. After that, bring the needle up on the other side of the shape.

open fishbone stitch

Keep making diagonal stitches that will overlap each other in the central area of the shape. If you want to achieve the same geometric pattern as in this example, slant your stitches to a more acute angle and for every new stitch you make, hold your working thread down so that you don't overlap with the ones above.

open fishbone stitch

So, this is how it will look with and without an outline.

open fishbone stitch

But you're probably more accustomed to seeing another open fishbone executing, so here is how a more “traditional” version of fishbone stitch looks. The difference is that the stitches are almost horizontal (relative to the central spine), so little is their slanting. And they are placed closer to each other. As you see, it is possible to work any shape with this one, even if it is curving or bending.

Raised fishbone stitch


This stitch is called “raised” because it basically lies on a cushion of preliminary stitching. But otherwise, it is very close to the original fishbone stitch.

raised fishbone stitch

Make a straight stitch for a sharper point on top and then bring the needle up on the outline of the shape, somewhere in the middle. Make a diagonal stitch reaching the point at the top and from the opposite side of the central stitch.

raised fishbone stitch

Now the needle emerges on the opposite side of where the previous stitch finished and we make a straight diagonal stitch back to the middle of the shape, inserting the needle on the outline.

raised fishbone stitch

The diagonal stitches will be crossing in their upper parts.

raised fishbone stitch

Keep going until you reach the bottom of the shape.

raised fishbone stitch

If you reached it and there is no place to continue making crossed diagonal stitches, just work a few satin stitches to cover the corners.

raised fishbone stitch

The end! Because of the cushioning effect, this stitch is generally more dimensional than simple fishbone. Think of satin stitch vs padded satin stitch.

Leaf stitch


Honestly speaking, for the longest time I couldn't understand what the difference between leaf stitch and open fishbone stitch was, so I used to skip learning it. But actually, the moment you try working it, the contrast will be more evident. Both, in the order of work, and in the look.

leaf stitch

We start working leaf stitch from the bottom. Make a diagonal stitch from one point of the outline to another one.

leaf stitch

Then mirror it with another diagonal stitch. They are supposed to cross at the bottom.

leaf stitch

And now, the key point. Your next stitch is supposed to start just outside of the previous one and in a position where you can make a parallel stitch to the first one.

leaf stitch

Again, start your new stitch just outside of the previous one at a point which will allow you to make your stitch parallel to the one below.

leaf stitch

And you continue working it the same way.

leaf stitch

It makes the central spine of the stitching kind of revealed opposed to the hidden one in open fishbone stitch.

Hope you practice the new stitches and find a way to incorporate in your projects! Find more stitches in the Stitch Library :)

4 comments

  1. Thanks for this tutorial! It came at the perfect time as I am about to start working on a table runner with an autumn leaf garland embroidered on the edges. Your directions are always clear and make it easy to follow. Thanks again for all your posts.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh my, I'm so happy it came in the right time for you! Wish your garland to turn out fabulous :)

      Delete
  2. Thank you so much for the easy to follow tutorials. Thanks you so much for blogging too. I suspect many follow but few comment. I hope readers will step up and comment on your posts. I would not want you to feel like you are wasting your time.
    xx, Carol

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh no, as long as I know that my posts are useful for someone, I will try to keep writing :) But thank you for sweet words, I appreciate a lot!

      Delete

Write what you think! ❤