Cotton flower hand embroidery: freebie and tutorial

Hand embroidery cotton flower

The second spring miniature has arrived! Today we stitch fluffy cotton flowers :)


Here's the list of all the spring miniatures from this project:
  1. Cotton flower

The urge to stitch a simple cotton flower branch had actually been eating me for quite a while after I saw some inspirational works on Pinterest. I didn't really want to make anything big and serious out of it. Just to stitch something small and lighthearted and not keep the inspiration and motivation constipated, haha.

Hand embroidery cotton flower

Hand embroidery cotton flower

Hand embroidery cotton flower

So, here's a small branch here. It is really easy, but it contains bullion knots, which I encourage you to practice beforehand if it is something new to you. Here, on the blog, you can find the tutorial on bullion stitch and a crash course to make things even clearer.


Other than bullion knots, there is nothing to worry here!

Hand embroidered Cotton flower tutorial


The link to the PDF pattern is placed at the end of the post.

Hand embroidery cotton flower

1. First, we stitch the stems. I used back stitch with 1 strand of floss in the needle. The twig is a little quirky and slightly changes angles here and there, so I think back stitch fits this design best of all. There are other line stitches you might want to try, like stem stitch or split stitch but it is a little more difficult to make sharp angles with them.

Hand embroidery cotton flower

2. Lazy daisy stitches for the leaves. If you find them too hollow for your liking, you can fill them with an extra straight stitch, like in Mimosa miniature.

Hand embroidery cotton flower

3. The cotton flowers here are worked in bullion stitches. If you are new to them. I believe it is better to spend some time practicing your bullion knots prior to making them on the actual design.

If you read the Bullion knot crash course, you will see there a tip on how to make a lazy daisy using bullion knot technique. Essentially, this is what we do here as well, except that the “base” of this stitch will be extremely short. But just like in that post, here we too make a lot of wraps around the needle to make a bigger arc. However, the arc shouldn't be too big, because we strive for a circular shape.

Another thing I do is that I purposefully loosen my wraps a bit so that the resulting stitch is fluffier. Usually, it is recommended that the wraps are tight enough around the shaft of the needle, which makes it impossible to use needles with slightly wider eyes. But because we make the wraps a little loose here, they can easily allow a wide-eyed needle go through them, like I show in the picture above.

I use 3 strands of cotton embroidery floss here to make the flowers. If you have wool thread, I think it can actually make the cotton flowers even fluffier and more realistic! I didn't have it by hand and buying it for one little miniature branch didn't seem practical to me, haha.

Hand embroidery cotton flower

4. When the bullion knot is ready, take the brown thread again and make 4 stitches each starting in the middle of the bullion knot and anchoring it on the sides.

Hand embroidery cotton flower

5. Two of the cotton flowers are smaller and they are worked by simple bullion knots (not arcs). For these ones, the wraps shouldn't be too loose! Make few straight stitches with brown thread around the bases of these flowers, some of the stitches can be worked right on top of the bullion knot (see the picture above).

Hand embroidery cotton flower

And so, it is ready!


We are taking a good pace so far with these miniatures, I really hope we will finish the whole set by the end of the month.

But next week I'm planning a marathon of new stitches to complete the chain stitch family! There will be a lot of new information, be prepared!


And for now, have a nice weekend :)